War Zone along Border forces closure of Public Lands.

border mtns.jpg     For the first time in its history the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge is closing part of its range to the public due to the increasingly dangerous situation along the U.S. / Mexico border.

     It has been instructive to watch the left completely overlook the environmental impact of the border crisis on the sensitive eco systems in Southern Arizona. I guess they have been too busy burning new homes and SUV’s.

Thursday 10-12-06, 7:50 am


Comments

  1. Randall Holdridge says

    I think that the bulk of environmental scientists and activist have concluded that the most environmentally destructive thing that can be done on the border would be construction of any barrier wall or fence. It’s obvious when you remember that particularly through Arizona, W. New Mexico, and California particularly, the border is strictly historico/political in nature, and not environmentally nor culturally derived.

    In Texas, the presence of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo makes the situation sligthly different. Also in that region, agreements between American private land owners, the Mexican industrial giant CEMEX, and in conjunction with Big Bend National Park and Black Gap State Park, have led to the creation of wildlife corridors which are also designed to deter illegal crossing.

    In Arizona, a devstating impact of the migration on foot has been the deluge of garbage, which has been harmful in itself and a direct bane for outdoors people like hunters, hikers,cyclists and campers, birders and photographers, etc. Volunteers from outdoor and immigrant support groups have made massive clean-up sweeps, but it’s a continuing problem which can be most easily solved by a regulated system of labor migration.

    The U.S.-Mexico border region has always had its risks of violence. They have been escalated by the increasingly armed response to the cross border traffic of goods (legal and illegal) which were spawned significantly by the contra-wars in the 80s and by the NAFTA induced population movement from the Mexican interior to the border, followed by the transfer of maquilladora production from Mexico to seek cheaper labor in Asia with the perfection of massive trans-oceanic container shipping.

    A major environmental impact of this development, of course, is unprecendented competition from countries like China and India for the international oil supply, with an unimaginably huge increase in the unregulated emission of green house gases.

    This list could go on, but the main point is that while we can see some of the manifestations on our border (litter, gunplay, highway deaths in over-loaded vans, etc.) what we are really talking about is economic globalization, and anger directed at dislocated Mexican peasants is myopic.

  2. Oro Valley Dad says

    Wrong again Randall. What we are really talking about is the complete failure of the Mexican Government to meet the aspirations of their people and allow them to live in a free and prosperous society.

    That is neither the fault nor responsibility of the U.S. Government. The security of the American people is.

  3. Randall Holdridge says

    Oro Valley Dad,

    You might at least make a gesture toward discussion of the well-informed approach I made to some aspects of the international question of migration — it’s not just our southern border which is being affected, you surely know.

    Like you, I don’t think much of the right-wing kleptocracy which has been the Mexican government since Carlos Salinas Gotari became president, andthe American-educated Mexican economists and the IMF/World Bank took over.

    But that wasn’t the issue. I’m claiming not that our southern border isn’t a problem, but that it is complex one, with causes and consequences far bigger than the little debate we’re having in Pima County.

    And since the post that started this comment thread is about the closure of some parts of the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, it will interest the intelectually curious to know that according to the refuge manager, Mitch Ellis, the closure is prompted by the proliferation of armed U.S. forces, the Border Patrol and the National Guard, raising the possibility of injury to visitors (today’s “Tucson Citizen”, page 1A, story by Claudine LoMonaco, reporter)

  4. Randall Holdridge says

    May I just add this thought. I visit this site because I find it interesting and a counter-point to the more centrist sites like Arizona 8th or AZ Congress Watch or Blog for Arizona, etc.

    I don’t comment on topics about which I don’t have information or opinions that might be considered to rise above the level of “common knowledge”. For example, I don’t comment on the frequent posts on this site about abortion because I admit I have neither studied nor thought about the subject very deeply.

    To the points I’ve raised on this particular thread, with some degree of seriousness — facts, examples, etc. — you answer with a “let the Mexican government solve the problem” toss out line.

    I always communicate under the the assumption that purpose of communication is communication, you know, like in communion or commune?

  5. Randall Holdridge says

    Oh, and this too, for an interesting and informed right-of-the-aisle, free-enterprise run at the questions of the border environment, try:

    http://www.cuencalosojos.org

  6. Oro Valley Dad says

    Blog for Arizona is hardly a “centrist” site.

    As evidence I offer this post in which Michael Bryan looses touch with reality over a billboard.

    The border question is not complicated at all. Every nation has a right to secure its border. If we secure the border then working class citizens will have to be paid a reasonable wage for their labor. Businesses will adjust and working people will get a better deal.

    As to those people who are currently living in the U.S. illegally I am sure we can work out a reasonable compromise after we secure the border. It’s actually very simple.

  7. Randall Holdridge says

    Well, so clearly you don’t know too much about the politics to the left of centrist Democrats like Michael Bryan at Blog for Arizona, and you’re not bashful to admit how little you’ve read or know about the left in general.

    What amazes me is that you would so unabashedly acknowledge in comments like #6 that you don’t know anything about the international trade and monetary policies of your own nation’s governmental and business leaders, and of the international agencies which your nation controls, but that you don’t have even a bright high school student’s command of basic macro-economics.

    I can’t begin to fill you in Oro Valley Dad, and you’ll never admit it, but in any serious sense, without regard to political party or nation state variances, you are ignorant of basic economic theory, of international finance and its implications.

    Let me say that again — you are ignorant — and apparently quite happy and self-satisfied to be so.

    You can repeat again and again your opinion that I’m too wordy, too intellectual, too snobish, etc., etc., that I’m wrong as usual. You can compare me to Noam Chomsky — as if you’d ever read his work — and whose ideas I share only marginally, or try to trash me as a relativist or secular humanist, which I certainly am not, and you can pretend that you have a well-grounded thought or opinion somewhere in your head.

    It doesn’t matter what you say about me, and it shouldn’t matter even to the true believers whose opinions you hope to lead on this site, because, Sir, on the very surface of things — and it’s transparent — you are ignorant.

    No crime in that, really no harm either — except that you fancy yourself a leader of the opinions of others. On the subject under discussion on this post which you intitiated, Sir, you don’t know $#!^ from Shinola.

  8. Oro Valley Dad says

    Randall I am crushed under the intellectual weight of your argument.

    Oh, nice language. Are we to assume that you are another centrist Democrat like Michael Bryan because of your similar use of profanity?

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