TOO MANY MEN: TOO FEW WOMEN

Just when I thought nothing could be worse than Arizona’s courts sending a 14 year old foster child across state lines for a late term abortion, sex-selective abortion and female infanticide makes its debut into my world.

Since taking a position at United Families International, I have learned that China and India produce 100 new-born baby girls for every 120 – 130 baby boys. This is alarmingly high. The international norm is 105 boys to 100 girls. This fairly new phenomena is believed to be caused by prenatal sex-selective abortion. Sex-selective abortion is the practice of purposely seeking out the gender of an unborn child and aborting it based on its gender.

Cultural norms, such as those in China and India where male children are preferred for social and financial reasons compound other important determinants such as poverty, government birth plans, and the composition of prior siblings. If China’s “one child” law meant to reduce its population explosion of the last decade, then it worked; the rate of population growth has slowed considerably, however China is fast becoming the land of missing women.

Some researchers believe 85% of aborted fetuses in rural China are female. And, additional studies show that sex-selective abortion of baby girls and female infanticide, the killing of new-born baby girls, are prevalent in every sector of Chinese society, not just rural areas.

Unintended consequences bring violence to the world

The United Nations reports that 7,000 girls daily are the victims of sex selective abortions in India. India, another Asian country that practices son preference for similar reasons to the Chinese, has 16 million more boys than girls under the age of 15. China has 14 million more boys than girls of the same age group, one of the unintended consequences to this inhumane crime against women and society. By 2020 there will be 40 million more men than women in China alone. No offense guys, but all that testosterone in one place is a recipe for disaster.

A book by Professors Valerie M. Hudson and Andrea M. der Boer, called Bare Branches: Security Implications of Asia’s Surplus Male Population, warns that war brought on by China and India is imminent. They believe the governments of India and China will find it convenient to develop and send their overabundance of men to war. Other nations, especially in the European Union will find defending their homeland difficult since most European nations are well below the population replacement level. The US is right at the replacement level…but it is falling.

Other unintended consequences from female infanticide and the imbalance of male and female ratios include rape, sex trafficking and prostitution, increased crime, societal unrest and obstruction to the development of democracy and prosperity.

China and India are not the only offenders of prenatal sex-selective abortion. Other nations, including the US are grappling with the same problem, but for different reasons.

Sex-selective abortion is frequently performed for non-medical reasons that do not threaten the life of the mother. Some families opt for it simply to balance the gender of their children; others are utilizing today’s technology to “design” their own families. Geneticists, ethicists, pro-life and pro-family experts are alarmed over the potential harm this practice will have to children, families and society as a whole.

Marcy Darnovsky, associate executive director for the Council for Responsible Genetics and author of, Revisiting Sex Selection: the Growing Popularity of New Sex Selection Methods Revives an Old Debate states:

“This constellation of technological, economic, cultural, and ideological developments has revived the issue of sex selection, relatively dormant for more than a decade…These include the prospect that selection could reinforce misogyny, sexism, and gender stereotypes; undermine the well-being of children by treating them as commodities and subjecting them to excessive parental expectations or disappointment; skew sex ratios in local populations; further the commercialization of reproduction; and open the door to a high-tech consumer eugenics.”

Technology finds a way to quench the curiosity of some parents. Believe it or not, a British company called DNA Worldwide is currently selling a mail order kit that determines the sex of unborn children as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. The company sells worldwide over the Internet, except to India and China. Since the kit is sold as “informational” and not medical, no regulation is necessary. The Pink or Blue Early Test Kit claims up to 99% accuracy and costs about $500. But, many fear that the kit will be used to sex select offspring.

Countries like Australia have begun investigations into the ethics and accuracy of such a kit. Australian Health Minister Tony Abbott, who called for the investigation said, “I have to say, speaking as a citizen rather than as a health minister, I tend to…regard kids as a gift to be cherished rather than as a commodity.”

I agree. Although, most laws have not caught up with technology. In Canada the law forbids sex selection for in vitro fertilization or other similar procedures, except in rare instances. It is clear that Canadian citizens are opposed to sex-selective abortion, even though there is no law restricting sex-selective abortion after the fetus is a few weeks old.

So far, no word on what the US will do. Chances are they are concerned about the implications of abortion rights and how to craft the restrictions. State legislatures will no doubt join in the fray. It will be interesting to see where pro-choice groups and individuals come down on this issue. After all most believe in the right to terminate a pregnancy for any reason – at any time, but how can anyone justify aborting a baby just because it is the wrong sex?


Comments

  1. Ah Laura you had me until the very end.

    “After all most believe in the right to terminate a pregnancy for any reason – at any time”

    That is patently untrue and as much time as you spend on this issue you know better.

  2. Walter, when 99% of all abortions are for convenience how can you dare to say otherwise?

    Nice to hear from you Laura!

  3. As someone who has dedicated over 20 years to the sanctity of life movement, I will wholeheartedly back up Laura on her last premise. Abortion in the United States is legal throughout all nine months of pregnancy up until the moment of birth, for any reason or no reason at all. Roe v. Wade defined the “new law” and Doe v. Bolton refined Roe’s caveats. The only restriction imposed is finding an abortionist who will perform the procedure. “Specialists” like George Killer in Kansas have carved out a niche in this “market.” Yes, the abortion industry has worked very hard to keep abortion as unrestricted as possible including finding such reasonable legislation as parental notification, parental consent, spousal notification, 24 hour waiting periods, informed consent and the ban on partial birth abortion. It’s a business.

  4. I don’t know of any such law in Canada preventing sex selection for IVF. I’m not saying you’re wrong, it’s just that in Canada’s anything goes as far as abortion is concerned.

  5. Streamingfaith.com has a headline: Poll: Most Pro-Choice Americans Still ‘Conservative’ on Abortion. It goes on to say that most would support some type of restriction on abortion. So, I guess it depends on who makes the definition of “pro-choice”, but almost every poll I’ve seen shows most people who id themselves as pro-choice are OK with at least one (and usually more) of the restrictions you list, Shane. That makes Laura’s otherwise excellent piece damaged by her misguided, untrue final point.

    http://www.streamingfaith.com/community/news/news.aspx?NewsId=926&bhcp=1

  6. Let me get this straight; please clarify. These professors think that China and India are going to launch wars of territorial expansion against the distant European Union, just to kill off their excess population of males?

    Do you seriously believe this scenario?

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