Terry Goddard Misrepresents Facts – Secretary Bennett Sets Record Straight

Secretary of State addresses the absurd claims by perennial candidate Terry Goddard.

PHOENIX – Candidates often make inflammatory statements as a tactic to provoke a sense of mistreatment to curry favor with voters.  However, blatant mischaracterizations about Arizona’s system of elections must be corrected.  With less than three weeks before the General Election, current Secretary of State Ken Bennett believes it’s necessary to clear up inaccurate information being presented by Terry Goddard over the past few months.

The latest examples occurred during the Clean Elections Debate, hosted by Arizona PBS.  During the broadcast, Mr. Goddard made two statements that were either terribly ignorant or deliberate misrepresentations of the truth for political gain.

“I’m confused where Mr. Goddard came up with amount of $2 million to implement the so-called Dual Track, or bifurcated system of voting in the primary,” said Secretary Bennett.  Truth is, our counties will spend about $500,000 for both the primary and general elections.  This system—one that I’ve repeatedly said is not ideal for election officials—was developed in response to two conflicting directives.  One from Arizona’s voters, (Prop. 200) and the U.S. Supreme Court (Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council of Ariz., Inc.)  As I’ve publically said before, and I’ll ask Mr. Goddard, which directive should we ignore; Arizona’s voters or the Supreme Court?

“In addition, I’m troubled by Mr. Goddard’s characterization that students, ‘who have to vote a federal ballot, are treated as second class citizens,’ which is patently false and simply absurd.  College students do not have to vote a federal form.  Those voting a federal ballot are simply doing so because they haven’t provided proof-of-citizenship to our County Recorders, a requirement approved by voters in 2004.  Election officials around the state are committed to treating each voter equally and for Mr. Goddard to assume otherwise is offensive to elections officials statewide.

“Combined with his conspiratorial accusation of voter suppression when he declared ‘independent voters get only one chance to cast a ballot,’ I question Mr. Goddard’s fundamental understanding of how elections work in Arizona. While I certainly appreciate Mr. Goddard’s compliment about my singing voice during the debate, I would ask he either learn the songs or stop making up the lyrics.”

Pro-Life Voter Warning on “Republican” Primary Candidates

Prior to an election I always like to vet candidates on a number of issues including life, liberty and other rights enshrined in our Constitution. The sanctity of life – protecting innocent human life – has always been the top issue for me because if a candidate or elected officials waffles on life, it reveals where they stand on all other rights.

Part of my vetting process looks at whether or not the candidate filled out certain surveys, their answers, public statements, their involvement on the issues and even who is pushing for their election. I also look at who is donating to their campaign and what people and organizations who are opposed to my values are saying about the candidates.

Because of my involvement in the Pro-Life movement for many years, naturally I look at who Planned Parenthood or other high profile pro-abortion organizations and individuals have said about certain candidates. By looking at the donations of “true believers” in a cause, one should get a sense of the value system of the recipient. It would be akin to looking at the donations of Wayne LaPierre. You wouldn’t expect him to donate to an anti-2nd Amendment candidate.

One particular organization and its people I’ve looked at is the Arizona WISH list. WISH stands for Women In the Senate and House. Their fundamental goal has always been to elect “pro-choice” Republican women as the GOP version of EMILY’s list (the Democrats pro-abortion women’s group).

On their national board of directors sat an Arizonan named Deborah Carstens. Although it doesn’t appear that AZ WISH is active or that she currently serves on the national board of directors, Carstens continues to remain active in elections through her donations primarily to candidates who have declared themselves to be “pro-choice” or refuse to state their position on the sanctity of life. These have typically been Republican candidates who define themselves as more moderate but tend to vote liberal on social issues.

Because I have my suspicions on a handful of candidates, I decided to check out a few resources to clarify their positions and to see if Carstens had donated to their campaigns.

Here’s what I found:

Scott Smith was the only gubernatorial candidate to receive a donation from Carstens in the amount of $500. Scott Smith also took the most liberal position on abortion of all the GOP candidates (survey)

Michele Reagan has received a total of $1,250 from Carstens as the only Republican candidate for Secretary of State. Reagan also avoided answering questions on the Center for Arizona Policy voter guide.

Carsten also donated $160 to Terry Goddard, the Democrat running for Secretary of State and $250 to Felecia Rotellini the Democrat candidate for Attorney General. Neither Democrat responded to the Center for Arizona Policy questionnaire – which is very typical of Democrat candidates.

When it comes to state legislative races, Carstens has donated to Republican incumbents and challengers.

In LD-11, Jo Grant received $150 from Carstens in her house race. On CAP’s survey, Grant to answer the question on abortion.

Diane Landis running for House in conservative district 13, also received a donation of $100 from Carstens. Surprisingly, Landis did answer the question on CAP’s survey.

No surprise, Heather Carter pocketed $500 from Carstens in her re-election bid in LD-15. Carter dodged filling out the CAP survey altogether.

Effie Carlson received $100 as a challenger in the LD-23 house race. Carlson did respond to the CAP survey but with qualifiers.

Finally, Kate Brophy-McGee in LD-28 took at $270 donation from Carstens in her house re-election race. Brophy-McGee also evaded the CAP survey.

Another quick check for pro-life endorsements revealed that none of these candidates were endorsed by the Arizona Right to Life PAC.

One interesting pattern among the incumbents who are running for re-election is that they also supported the Obamacare Medicaid expansion vote in 2013. And one may recall that an amendment was attempted on that bill that would have prohibited tax dollars from going to abortion providers. That amendment failed thanks to these incumbents – Carter, Coleman & Brophy-McGee (see vote).

For those of you who remain committed to electing candidates who will protect innocent human life, hopefully this has been informative and an exercise in how to cross-reference candidates and their supporters. Please use this information wisely as you vote in the Primary Election.

Today’s Videos: Goddard, Gosar, Quayle

Terry Goddard on the investigation by Attorney General Tom Horne. Goddard’s comments should make your blood boil! Thank God he was not elected Governor!

Mitt Romney in Sun Lakes:

Rep. Gosar discussing the economic impact H.R. 1904, the Congressman’s jobs bill, would have in the Copper Corridor.

The Subcommittee on Water and Power today held a legislative hearing on H.R. 2842, the “Bureau of Reclamation Small Conduit Hydropower Development and Rural Jobs Act of 2011,” introduced by Rep. Scott Tipton (CO-03) and cosponsored by Rep. Paul Gosar (AZ-01). The legislation streamlines burdensome red tape and reduces administrative costs for the installation of increased small canal and pipeline hydropower development projects.

Congressman Quayle reporting on the YouCut program:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9MMrSGksGU

Brewer Capitulates to Goddard in Preview of General Election Contest

Democrat President Harry Truman is reported to have once said, “Give the people a choice between a Republican and a Republican and they will vote for the Republican every time.”

That was then, this is now.

Accidental Governor Jan Brewer’s sales tax increase compulsion has rewritten that sentiment, “Give the people a choice between a Democrat and a Democrat and they will vote for the Democrat every time.”

What a disgrace.

— MBW

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May, 11, 2010                                                         

GODDARD STANDS WITH TEACHERS

Having Killed Irresponsible Corporate Tax Giveaways, Attorney General Supports Prop 100 For Schools

Phoenix – Today Attorney General Terry Goddard stood with teachers to support the temporary sales tax increase, Prop. 100. His support came after Governor Jan Brewer finally heeded Goddard’s call to reject a massive corporate tax giveaway which would have been detrimental to Arizona’s economy, costing Arizona taxpayers up to $950 million per year. Today Brewer said that there was “no way” she would “do the business tax cuts.” 

In March, Goddard sent Governor Brewer a letter calling on her to promise to veto the fiscally irresponsible measure.  “The corporate tax giveaways that were proposed were always the wrong thing to do for our state-and thankfully we stopped them,” said Goddard. 

Now that the corporate tax giveaways are off the table, Goddard announced his support for Prop. 100.  “Prop 100 is not the long term solution that we need, but we cannot balance the budget on the backs of our children.”  

In contrast to the current approach taken at the Capitol, Goddard has promised an administration that will put aside political labels, and bring together leaders of all parties in order to find solutions to Arizona’s budget problems. 

Election 2010: GOP’s Martin, Mills Lead Goddard, AG tops Governor

Rasmussen Reports – Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Likely Democratic candidate Terry Goddard now trails two potential Republican opponents in the latest look at Arizona’s gubernatorial contest.

A new Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of likely voters in the state finds State Treasurer Dean Martin leading Goddard 43% to 38%. Just six percent (6%) favor some other candidate in this match-up, while 13% are undecided. In January, Martin led Goddard by nine points.

Political newcomer Buz Mills, who has begun introducing himself to the state through a series of TV ads, now leads Goddard 43% to 37%. Seven percent (7%) prefer another candidate in this match-up, while 13% are not sure.

But incumbent Republican Governor Jan Brewer, embroiled in the state’s budget crisis, now trails Goddard 45% to 36% in her bid for reelection. Twelve percent (12%) of voters like another candidate, and seven percent (7%) are undecided. In January, Brewer and Goddard were in a virtual tie after the Democrat held a nine-point lead in November.

Against former state GOP Chairman John Munger, Goddard holds a 42% to 36% advantage. Thirteen percent (13%) of voters pick some other candidate, and nine percent (9%) are undecided.

In the state’s Republican Primary race for governor, Mills’ entrance has created a virtual three-way tie with Martin and Brewer. Longtime incumbent John McCain now leads conservative challenger J.D. Hayworth by just seven points in Arizona’s hotly contested Republican Senate Primary race. State Republicans will pick their Senate and gubernatorial nominees in an August 24 primary. Goddard, the state’s current attorney general, is expected to be the Democrats’ nominee for governor.

Male voters prefer Martin and Mills to Goddard among male voters but move into the Democrat’s column when Brewer or Munger is the Republican in the race. Female voters lean toward the Democrat unless Martin’s on the ballot.

Similarly, voters not affiliated with either party prefer Goddard over Brewer or Munger. But unaffiliateds give a slight edge to Martin and Mills over Goddard in those match-ups.

Fifteen percent (15%) of Arizona voters have a very favorable opinion of Goddard, while 13% view the Democrat very unfavorably.

Martin is viewed very favorably by 11% and very unfavorably by seven percent (7%).

Ten percent (10%) of voters have a very favorably impression of Mills, while only nine percent (9%) view him very unfavorably. Thirty-nine percent (39%) have no opinion of him.

Fewer than 10% of voters have a strong favorable or unfavorable opinion of Munger, while 40% of voters don’t know enough about him to venture any opinion at all.

Seven percent (7%) of Arizona voters view Brewer very favorably, but 24% view the governor very unfavorably.

At this point in a campaign, Rasmussen Reports considers the number of people with strong opinions more significant than the total favorable/unfavorable numbers.

Just 41% approve of the job Brewer is doing in office, while 55% disapprove. This includes eight percent (8%) who Strongly Approve and 22% who Strongly Disapprove.

Brewer, as Arizona’s secretary of state, became governor last January when Janet Napolitano moved to Washington to serve as secretary of Homeland Security. But battles over the state budget have taken a toll on her popularity and prompted challenges within her own party. Brewer is currently pushing a three-year temporary one percent increase in the state’s 5.6 percent sales tax to help close the state’s huge budget deficit. Voters will decide on that proposal in a May 18 referendum.

Fifty-three percent (53%) of voters in the state now favor the temporary sales tax increase, but 36% oppose it. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided.

Thirty-five percent (35%) say the economy will be stronger a year from now, but 44% think it will be weaker. Thirteen percent (13%) expect it to stay about the same.

Eighty-five percent (85%) of Arizona voters are at least somewhat concerned about drug-related violence in Mexico spilling over into the United States, with 60% who are very concerned. Given Arizona’s location, it comes as no surprise that its voters are more concerned about this outcome than voters on the national level.

However, Arizona voters are split on the question of what concerns them more: 45% say illegal immigration is a greater concern, while 43% name Mexican drug violence.

Seventy-five percent (75%) of Arizona voters believe the U.S. military should be used along the Mexican border if violence continues to escalate there. Just 12% disagree. These results are similar to those found nationwide.

Only 36% of voters in Arizona favor the health care reform plan passed by President Obama and Congress, while 60% disapprove. Voters in Arizona are more opposed to the plan than voters on the national level.

By a 62% to 29% margin, Arizona voters prefer passing smaller plans that address individual problems in the health care system than one large comprehensive plan.

A solid plurality of the state’s voters (48%) says their local representative does not deserve to be reelected to Congress, and 71% believe it would be better for the country if most incumbents up for reelection this November were defeated.

Twenty-seven percent (27%) of Arizona voters describe themselves as part of the Tea Party movement.

In the 2008 election, Obama lost to favorite son McCain 54% to 45%. Forty-two percent (42%) now approve of Obama’s performance as president, with 29% who Strongly Approve. Fifty-six percent (56%) disapprove, including 51% who Strongly Disapprove. This is roughly comparable to Obama’s job approval ratings nationally in the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll.

In 2008, Rasmussen Reports projected nationally that Obama would defeat John McCain by a 52% to 46% margin. Obama won 53% to 46%. Four years earlier, Rasmussen Reports projected the national vote totals for both George W. Bush and John Kerry within half-a-percentage-point.

In Arizona during the 2008 campaign, Rasmussen Reports polling showed McCain winning the state by a 51% to 45% margin. McCain defeated Obama 54% to 45%. In the 2006 Arizona governor’s race, Rasmussen polling showed Janet Napolitano defeating Len Munsil 58% to 37%. Napolitano won 63% to 35%. In the 2006 race for U.S. Senate, Rasmussen polling showed Jon Kyl leading Jim Pederson by nine, 51% to 42%. Kyl won by nine, 53% to 44%.

Arizona Guardian: Brewer struggles to raise campaign cash

Money isn’t the only daunting challenge facing Jan Brewer’s campaign… her highly-paid consultant apparently is preparing for a September primary victory.  I think John Munger, Vernon Parker, Dean Martin, Buz Mills, Robert Graham, Doug Ducey and any other GOP gubernatorial hopeful will be looking to peak a little earlier, say August 24, 2009. 

— MBW

BREWER STRUGGLES TO RAISE CAMPAIGN CASH
Tuesday, December 22, 2009
By Dennis Welch 
The Arizona Guardian 
  
Gov. Jan Brewer isn’t raising money as fast as her political handlers would like and is lagging behind her GOP opponents. 
 
Brewer plans on running as a publicly funded candidate but is allowed to raise up to $50,000 in small contributions, known as seed money, until she qualifies. 
 
The governor’s political advisers were hopeful it would take just a few days to raise the money after Brewer announced on Nov. 5 that she was running for a full term. 
 
But it didn’t turn out that way. As of last week the governor was still chasing after seed money, according to emails obtained by the Guardian
 
Invitations for a Dec. 14th fund-raising event were very clear that the governor still needed donations. Those contributions are capped at $140 per person and $280 per couple. 
 
Chuck Coughlin, the governor’s chief political adviser, would not say whether Brewer has raised the rest of the money since the event last week. 
 
“We will not be playing any horse race games for tomorrow’s headlines,” Coughlin said Tuesday. “They only thing we care about is winning in September and November, of which I am assured.” 
 
It was Coughlin who sent out an email to potential donors that he wanted to wrap up the seed money in several days. That was more than six weeks ago.  
 
“The campaign needs as many $140/$280 contributions… as possible by close of business tomorrow,” Coughlin said in the Nov. 5 email. “It will take many oars in the water on this one but the campaign needs your help today and tomorrow… It would be great if we can knock this out in the next few days.” 
 
A candidate’s ability to raise money is traditionally considered an early test of the candidate’s viability. Brewer suffers from low approval ratings among voters, according to recent polling data.
 
Brewer is trailing her potential political rivals when it comes to raising her seed money. 
 
Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard finished up on Dec. 8, according to volunteers with his campaign. Goddard, who is considered the favorite to win the Democratic nomination for governor, formally announced his candidacy one day after Brewer. 
 
Paradise Valley Mayor Vernon Parker says it took him 41 days to raise his seed money. Parker, a Republican, launched his campaign last summer. 
 
The three candidates are running under the state’s clean elections system which means they will receive public money to pay for their campaigns. But before they can get their cash they must qualify by collecting $5 donations from about 5,000 registered voters. 
 
Once they are eligible, gubernatorial candidates receive about $777,000 for the primary and another $1.1 million for the general election. 
 
Other candidates for governor are not expected to run with public money. John Munger and Owen “Buz” Mills, both Republicans, are running traditional. And state Treasurer Dean Martin, also a Republican, is not expected to run as an clean election candidate should he decide to jump in the race.

US Senator Janet Napolitano?

This is going to be one of those SWAG post.

With the recent security breech at the White House, I have to wonder if Janet Napolitano is getting homesick? She may even be reading the recent polling data here in Arizona showing Terry Goddard leading in the race for Governor and Senator John McCain vulnerable in his re-election bid.

And with Arizona Democrats looking for someone “inspiring” to lead off the November 2010 ticket, could there be an effort to bring Janet home to run against John McCain?

She’s already proven herself three times (once for AG and twice for Governor). Could her duty at Department of Homeland Security be brief?

Let’s just say, I would not be surprised to see Janet return to Arizona and take on John McCain next year…

57% Disapprove Brewer’s Job Performance, Loses Head-to-Head to Goddard by Nine Points

Terry Goddard vs. Dean Martin a dead heat, Arpaio most popular

From Rasmussen Reports
Monday, November 23, 2009

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio is the Republicans’ best shot at holding onto the Arizona governorship in 2010 against likely Democratic candidate Terry Goddard.

A new Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of Arizona voters finds Arpaio, famed for his crackdowns on illegal immigrants, leading Goddard, the state’s current attorney general, by 12 points – 51% to 39%. Seven percent (7%) prefer some other candidate, and four percent (4%) are undecided.

Embattled incumbent Republican Jan Brewer, who stepped up to the governorship from secretary of state when Janet Napolitano became secretary of Homeland Security, trails Goddard by nine points – 44% to 35%. In that match-up, nine percent (9%) like another candidate. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure whom they’ll vote for.

Another possible GOP candidate, State Treasurer Dean Martin, is in a virtual tie with Goddard. The Democrat beats Martin 40% to 38%, with 11% opting for some other candidate and another 11% undecided.

Brewer is seen very favorably by just five percent (5%) and very unfavorably by 19%.

For Martin, very favorables total nine percent (9%) and very unfavorables five percent (5%).

Goddard, who also served as mayor of Phoenix, is regarded very favorably by 15% and very unfavorably by 14%.

At this point in a campaign, Rasmussen Reports considers the number of people with a strong opinion more significant than the total favorable/unfavorable numbers.

Arizona is one of the hardest hit states in the country budgetwise, and just 39% of voters now approve of Brewer’s performance as governor. Only four percent (4%) strongly approve. Fifty-seven percent (57%) disapprove of the job she is doing, with 24% who strongly disapprove.

Fifty-eight percent (58%) say economic conditions in Arizona are getting worse. Just 13% say they are getting better, while 22% think they’re staying about the same.

[Click here to read the entire article.]

“Draft Dean Martin” Flair Flaunted

Draft Dean Martin Governor Arizona

We’ve all heard a version of the story about the Madison Avenue advertising hot shot who created the most persuasive and impactful campaign ever to sell a new brand of dog food. It failed miserably. The problem: the dogs wouldn’t eat the dog food.

I thought of that story not once but twice last week when Governor Jan Brewer and then Attorney General Terry Goddard filed papers for the 2010 Arizona gubernatorial election.

Arizona can do better.

I’m beginning to see “Draft Dean Martin” buttons being worn around town. Finally, a Choice, Not an Echo!