Debunked! Mediocre Republic movie reviewer gets all science-y on Kari Lake

Bill Goodykoontz of the Arizona Republic wishes the world to know that he hates Donald Trump.

A leftist political theorist trapped in the body of a mediocre newspaper movie reviewer, Goodykoontz recently wrote about Queen Elizabeth’s coronavirus speech by whining about how they got elegant, old Ms. Windsor while we got the Bad Orange Man. He “reviews” White House COVID press conferences as a projection of his self-image as a Jim Acosta fellow traveler:

“Keep reporting,” he urges the White House press corps. “Keep telling the truth. Keep grinding out stories that are important and accurate and let the criticism fall where it may.”

So brave. So, so very brave. Mind-numbingly wrong for nearly three years (and, in most instances, still counting) about “Russian collusion” and consumed with getting their daily quota of gotchas, they are nonetheless so very brave. In Goody’s eyes. He is CNN’s Brian Stelter if Brian Stelter also had George Stephanopoulos-ish boyish bangs and performed his daily dance of Trump-hate in the desert.

He is a mediocre movie review who loathes Donald Trump. And he so very much wants you to know that. Not the “mediocre” part, but you know what I mean.

But Goody is not of the WH Press Corps, so he must find local Trumpishness to ferret out. He’s zeroed in recently on Fox 10 news anchor Kari Lake. From time to time, Lake has indicated, usually on Twitter, that she may hold some conservative feelings. This drives Goody (and others in the Republic’s dwindling stable of lefties) into paroxysms of rage. They must make her stopp… er, stop.

Goody discovered that Lake had recommended her Twitter followers read about the two California doctors who created a 50-minute YouTube video that she called “one of the most HONEST COVID-19 briefings I have heard to date.” Dr. Daniel Erickson and Dr. Artin Massihi argued against the strict applications of sheltering in place.

Goody scolded Lake for recommending people hear what the two doctors had to say. “I would also advise against members of the media offering tacit support for debunked theories.”

YouTube now (in)famously banished the video “for violating YouTube’s Community Guidelines,” which apparently forbid using one’s experiences on the frontlines of the fight against the COVID-19 virus to take issue with prevailing government diktats.

The American Academy of Emergency Medicine and the American College of Emergency Physicians jointly “and emphatically” issued a condemnation of arguments presented by the two doctors.

The statement was frankly snarky, suggesting they were in it for the money: “As owners of local urgent care clinics, it appears these two individuals are releasing biased, non-peer reviewed data to advance their personal financial interests…”).

Now, I don’t know if ultimately this economy-wrecking practice of sheltering in place will save us from the virus in the long run. Maybe it will. Maybe the large, inflexible organizations like the AAEM and the ACEP will be proved right. But, then, I can’t help noticing that the Swedes, whose social views leftists usually claim to admire, seem to be siding with the California docs on this one. And they seem to be having some success at it, too. Is Sweden, too, grasping irrationally at “debunked theories?”

Which ever, Goody contends that the AAEM and the ACEP jointly “debunked” the Californians. I don’t think that word means what he thinks it means.

Their statement spoke harshly of the doctors’ views, which they said were “inconsistent with current science and epidemiology regarding COVID-19.” But nowhere did it say how or why. Common usage of “to debunk” is to “expose the sham or falseness” of something. The two doc-orgs didn’t do that.

All we have here are two doctors citing accumulated open-source data to conclude that sheltering in place is counter to good health. They may be wrong in those conclusions, but we don’t know why from the institutional reaction to them. All we have on the other side is large organizations saying little more than “shut up.”

And we have a journalist (no doubt a lot of them) playing Greek chorus and adding that “you shut up, too, Kari Lake!”

That’s the part that really gnaws at me. Goody self-righteously scolds Lake: “Haven’t theories like this cost us enough already? Let’s stick to the facts, please.”

Oh! Facts! Stand back, people. Goody’s got… science on his side!

But what “facts” are they? When do our movie-reviewer fact-mongers think the doors actually should open? Biden adviser and Obamacare designer Zeke Emanuel argues that we “have no choice” but to keep these strict social-distancing measures in place for 18 months. Would it be anti-science-y even to suggest that they end sooner? If so, when, Bill?

And, you know, it’s not like those powerful, institutional voices dictating shelter-in-place policy haven’t already been proved wrong on a point or two.

In maybe the most pompous declaration ever uttered by a mediocre movie reviewer, Goody says of Lake that “I would also advise against members of the media offering tacit support for debunked theories.”

Like, oh… Russian collusion?