In Biden’s America, Americans Should Go Where They’re Treated Best

With President Biden’s approval rating down to 36 percent, he is now more unpopular than his two predecessors ever were in office.

But, beyond politics, the very idea of America is losing luster. Nearly two-thirds of Americans (and rising) believe their country is headed in the right direction. For decades, it was assumed that America is the place to be an entrepreneur. The U.S. economy was synonymous with the American Dream. No longer: Upward mobility may be more alive in Canada than in America.

Indeed, upward mobility has been disincentivized, while the climbers are punished for daring to succeed. Government benefits are plentiful, while “taxing the rich” is the easiest refrain in politics. Under President Biden’s “Build Back Better” plan, the average top tax rate on personal income would reach 57.4 percent in the United States—the highest rate in the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). All 50 states, plus Washington, D.C., would impose top tax rates on personal income exceeding 50 percent.

Today’s experiment in Big Government won’t end well for the United States. But it will make entrepreneurs, investors, and other wealthy Americans reconsider their place in the world and reevaluate their options—and that’s a good thing. Countries should compete for residents. If people aren’t treated well in one country, why shouldn’t they go where they’re treated better?

People with means ultimately go where they’re treated best, and Americans are reaping the benefits of globalization more than ever before. From Croatia to the Caribbean, digital nomads across the socioeconomic spectrum are leaving one lifestyle for a better one. 

As an offshore consultant who guides clients to where they’re treated best, I regularly advise high-net-worth individuals on second citizenship and residences. And, in recent months, I have seen a 300 percent increase in wealthy Americans seeking better tax climates and brighter futures. They have had enough of 50 percent tax rates.

While tax policy is a top complaint, there are other gripes. One is “woke” culture, which tightens the parameters of free speech and forces people into submission through political correctness. In a world of seemingly endless cancellations and contrived apologies, the First Amendment is under attack from all sides, while its public defenders are fewer and farther between.

Put it all together, and the result is a less appealing America to those with options. Other than patriotism and personal allegiance, why should a New York entrepreneur remain in a city with rising crime and legal drug injection sites? Why put up with constantly changing COVID-19 policies in Washington, D.C., when foreign governments may be more transparent? Why stick with 50 percent tax rates when tax climates are better in dozens of Asian, European, and South American countries?

I have lived in dozens of countries around the world, and it’s reassuring to escape the radical Left’s grasp abroad. In some Eastern European countries, “wokeism” doesn’t even exist. Politics isn’t a fact of everyday life. People treat each other like human beings, not Twitter bots. In many Latin American countries, you can live more affordably and retain your individualism—free from government overreach. The same goes for certain Asian countries that continue to value entrepreneurship and upward mobility—with no disincentives, no punishments.

This is not to be alarmist for alarmism’s sake. But Americans need to ask themselves, and they are: Am I treated well here? Can I live better elsewhere?

With each passing day, more and more Americans are rethinking the meaning of “home.” The ongoing exodus to Florida is a perfect example. If people can move from New York to the Sunshine State for a better tax climate and brighter future, why can’t they move abroad too?

They can, and they are. The American exodus is here to stay and growing by the day.

Andrew Henderson is the founder of Nomad Capitalist, an international offshore consulting firm.

Ugenti-Rita: Arizona Small Businesses Will Benefit from Tax Bill

Michelle Ugenti-RitaA little over a month ago, President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act into law, and Americans are already feeling better than ever about the state of our economy. In a recent poll from Quinnipiac University, 66 percent of Americans rated the nation’s economy as either “excellent” or “good”—a three percentage point jump since last month.

It’s difficult to not be excited about the impact the tax bill is having on Arizona and its small businesses. The relief could not have come sooner.

Arizona is home to nearly 500,000 small businesses that employ approximately one million people. For too long these entities have struggled under a burdensome tax code that has prevented growth. With the previous federal tax rate approaching 40 percent, small businesses saw much of their hard-earned revenue disappear into the pockets of Uncle Sam.

Fortunately, measures included in the new tax relief package will reduce this burden. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act created a 20 percent standard deduction that applies to roughly 95 percent of small businesses and eliminates high tax brackets in favor of new, lower ones.

To put the standard deduction in layman’s terms, with the help of the new tax legislation, small businesses earning $200,000 a year are able to shield their first $40,000 of income from taxation. That extra cash can now be funneled into employee bonuses, wage increases, job creation, and business expansion. These measures will further bolster Arizona’s pro-business, pro-growth reputation.

According to a report by BMO Financial Group, Arizona’s business environment is already strong. While most state economies are expected to grow by an average of 2.2 percent, Arizona anticipates 2.8 percent growth in 2018. The tax cuts package will only accelerate that advancement.

In fact, we are already seeing some positive results in the state. Arizona-based YAM Worldwide announced it will be giving out $1.3 million in bonuses to its employees. Furthermore, over 1,000 JPMorgan Chase employees in Arizona will receive wage hikes or bonuses as part of the companies nationwide $20 billion, five-year plan to invest back into the country.

In addition, a report from the nonpartisan Tax Foundation found the bill will create almost 6,500 jobs in the state.

These must be the “crumbs” Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats scoffed at while trying to explain away the benefits resulting from tax relief. For some, these “crumbs” represent eased rent worries, the ability to afford childcare or help with the skyrocketing costs of healthcare.

The examples chronicled above are only a small piece of the benefits the tax bill has induced. Imagine the impacts Arizona will feel a year from now.

Rep. Michelle Ugenti-Rita (R) is the Chair of the Arizona House Ways and Means Committee and represents the 23rd House District

EU Video Going Viral: Nigel Farage Speaks Out on the Euro Debt Crisis

Like Daniel Hannan, Member of European Parliament Nigel Farage is a plain-spoken Brit who sees what is happening across Europe and cannot remain silent.  The video below, uploaded June 13, is titled “The Genius of Mutual Indebtedness.”  It is fast going viral.

How will the EU countries respond to Farage?  Will they finally begin pulling back on their socialist welfare state?  Or will they perhaps re-lower the retirement age as the socialist president of France, François Hollande, just did? Or perhaps they will look for some convenient scapegoats?

Given our own debt and over-spending problems in the US, how much sympathy should we have for our EU friends who, protected for 60 years by an American-taxpayer-funded military umbrella, have fully embraced the socialist welfare state as their preferred political model?

For more on the EU debt crisis, see the video below in which Farage engages in dialog with Ken Livingstone, former Mayor of London.  The discussion is primarily about EU debt. Livingstone is known to Americans largely for his open policies on immigration that have led some to call London “Londonistan”.

Put “Nigel Farage” into a YouTube search box, and you will find many more occasions where Mr. Farage speaks out against the EU both in its concept and its execution.

Why should we in America care about all this? As I wrote in a post last October, “Europe is living in our future and we don’t want to go there.”  Consider where Agenda 21 advocates are trying to take America and picture a global version of the EU enveloping and smothering our country.

If well-intentioned, kind-hearted Americans really want to help Europe in this looming debacle, the best thing we can do is (1) send the Obama entourage back to Chicago and the faculty lounges of the Leftist universities from whence they came, and (2) restore free markets, Constitutionally limited government, and fiscal/personal responsibility.  The resulting boom in America will be the example European and other countries need to set things right.