How They Voted – House Stimulus Package

Late this afternoon, the US House passed HR1 – The House Stimulus Package – by a vote of 244-188.

All Republican voted against the bill. Eleven Democrats joined with those 177 Republicans.

Arizona’s House Delegation voted as follows:

Ann Kirkpatrick (D-1) – YEA
Trent Franks (R-2) – NAY
John Shadegg (R-3) – NAY
Ed Pastor (D-4) – YEA
Harry Mitchell (D-5) – YEA
Jeff Flake (R-6) – NAY
Raul Grijalva (D-7) – YEA
Gabrielle Giffords (D-8) – YEA

(Official Roll Call)

The bill now moves over to the US Senate where it will likely pass.

Elections have consequences…


Comments

  1. I was hoping that Gabby might have showed some blue hair. No such luck.

  2. Congrats to the Republicans. They finally figured it out.

    Dems are proving how insane, out of touch and power-hungry they really are. $4 BILLION for ACORN to stimulate the economy? Disgusting.

  3. It ain’t over ’til the fat lady sings.

    I understand there is $350 million in the pork feast for prevention of STDs.

    Considering what the majority in the House is doing to American citizens, that may be the part of the bill least objectionable.

  4. Better let Jon Kyl and John McCain know how you want them to vote when the bill arrives in the Senate. Tell them DOA!

  5. Your final comment is correct: elections have consequences. Just as no Republicans in either house of Congress supported President Clinton’s raise in taxes (which did not cause an immediate recession – the tax cuts were in 1993 and the economy grew at a good clip till late 2000, and Clinton ended his second term with a big budget surplus due to the increased revenue from taxes), we may be moving more toward a British-style parliamentary system of party-line votes, common to most parliamentary systems.

    There is nothing inherently wrong with this. It makes one party responsible for the actions of government, and hence accountable by the voters.

    President Obama did not need to go to the Republican caucus (something President Bush did not do) and talk with them, but he did. He does want to involve them in his plans, and he did take out the family planning money and the Mall renovations and made other concessions. After the vote, Republican House and Senate leaders were invited to a cocktail party at the White House.

    As you say eloquently, elections have consequences. From my point of view, voters rejected the Republicans because although we had historic tax cuts under Bush, job creation was anemic and incomes for average people actually fell. The tax cut strategy didn’t work. For eight years the Bush Presidency confused cutting taxes with offering a broad economic strategy that would help prepare the nation for the great challenges of this emerging century – and we are all paying the price today: Massive structural budget deficits, ready to grow worse with the retirement of the baby boom. Aging infrastructure. Years of flat wages and declining incomes. Record home foreclosures and personal bankruptcies. 2nd tier rates of broadband penetration. Rising rates of poverty and those without health insurance. A terribly broken immigration system. A global round of economic liberalization unfinished. A badly bungled TARP. But of course one big thing did get done during this period – those massive set of tax cuts for the very wealthiest Americans.

  6. George of the Desert says

    Yes, Bush did preside over tax cuts, but he made the fiscally imprudent decision to increase federal spending at the same time.

    Tax cuts work, but they have to be accompanied by responsible spending. Voters who usually vote Republican abandoned the GOP in 2006 and 2008 largely because Congressional Republicans spent tax dollars just like Democrats.

  7. Veritas Vincit says

    I wonder how the ‘seasoned’ citizens of CD’s 1,5 &8 will feel about Tom Daschel being charged with the establishement of a committee to ration health care benefits? (Yeah, that’s in the ‘stimulus’ bundle thesee morons approved)

  8. Steve Calabrese says

    This is McCain’s time to shine.

    He has two choices:

    1. Filibuster against the stimulus package.

    2. Don’t filibuster, and face certain opposition in the Republican primary.

    Voting against this bill is not enough. If there was ever an occasion that called for a filibuster, this is it. McCain no longer listens to the tally counts from his phone calls; this much is clear. He’s out of touch. However, he does listen to Kyl, so make sure you call Kyl’s office as well.

    -Steve

  9. Very nice information. Thanks for this.

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