David Schweikert Releases First General Election Ad

Editors Note: We contacted the Schweikert campaign and confirmed that the following press release was actually issued on Friday, September 12th with ads scheduled to begin airing on Friday September 12th .

For Immediate Release: September 12, 2008
Contact: Lauren C. Barnett

Schweikert Releases New Television Ad – Highlights Mitchell Anti-Drilling Voting Record

SCOTTSDALE, AZ – Today, the David Schweikert for Congress campaign, released the inaugural general Election television advertisement.    

The new advertisement calls into question Rep. Harry Mitchell’s anti-drilling voting record.  Press Secretary Lauren C. Barnett said, “It is extremely disappointing that Rep. Mitchell voted to block new drilling and thereby perpetuating America’s dependence on Middle Eastern oil and higher gas prices at the pump.  With a mere 54 days until the Election, Democrats are clearly playing politics with oil.” 

David Schweikert, who fiercely protected Arizonans’ tax dollars as the Maricopa County Treasurer, understands the importance of domestic drilling.

Schweikert stated, “Americans have declared we need to be less dependent on foreign sources of oil.  In Congress, I will vote for domestic drilling and be an independent voice for responsible energy policy,” he concluded.

To view the ad, click on the photo below.

 


Comments

  1. Graphically seems weird with the red words in parantheses coming in from one side, and the other words coming in from the other side. What’s up with that? Then opening the second, positive half with David at a desk makes him appear oddly bookish and passive when one of his attributes ought to be his relative youth and energy. Overall a pretty weak effort.

  2. Oh be real Bill, as everyone on this sight has seen I have been very critical of Schweikert so far but I am glad he is out with an ad on an issue that polling seems to show matters to voters.

    The ad kind of tries to do to much, with attacking Mitchell for oil drilling, then for a negative campaign and then trying to introduce himself to voters and show what he did as treasurer. It is a lot to cram into a 30 second ad. I just wonder if it will be to much for voters…

  3. Hmmm… Odd day to release a video. Why not have the courtesy to wait one day? Maybe the intern hit the publish button instead of the save button.

  4. The DCCC did not stop airing their negative ad attacking Schweikert yesterday.

  5. P. Meyers you have to be realistic with this stuff, the same way Schweikert does not control how much money the NRCC uses or what their ads say, the same goes for Mitchell and what the DCCC does….

    Those kind of “well they are just as bad” is not how Schweikert is going to win against Mitchell.

    Be happy he is on the air so quickly and since it is obvious Schweikert staff read and comment on this blog give them constructive criticism for the next ads.

  6. My point is that if Mitchell wanted to be creatable he should have denounced the DCCC airing their ad as well as Schweikert.

    He is just playing politics….

  7. Not only will domestic drilling to little to lower oil prices now or in the future, most of the foreign oil we get is not from the Middle East, so claiming we are dependent on Middle Eastern oil is untrue.

  8. George of the Desert says

    Todd:

    You need a lesson in world politics and economics. Your argument is both absurd and incorrect in every respect.

    But since you have your head in the sand, see if you can find any oil. Ooops, that’s right, the Dems wouldn’t let us drill for it anyway.

    Thanks for playing. Johnny Olson will tell you about your parting gifts.

  9. How so George? Care to back your argument up with any actual information or do you think just claiming someone is wrong makes it so.

  10. George of the Desert says

    My pleasure, Todd:

    The United States is the largest oil importer in the world, bringing in 13.5 million barrels per day (mbd), which accounts for 63.5 percent of total U.S. daily con­sumption (20.6 mbd). Oil from the Middle East (spe­cifically, the Persian Gulf) accounts for 17 percent of U.S. oil imports, and this dependence is growing. – source, Ariel Choen, Ph.D, Heritage Foundation.

    Now, if you add in the foreign suppliers of US oil who would be considered relatively unfriendly to the US or otherwise unstable you would have this list:

    Nigeria (political unrest threat): 8%
    Angola (ditto): 3%
    Algeria (ditto); 3%
    Russia (unreliable quasi “ally”): 2.5 %
    Venezuela (hostile to US): 2%
    Gabon (political unrest): 1%
    Columbia (all, but politically shaky): 1%

    I’ll add Mexico even though the govt. there is, despite being basically corrupt, essentially stable –for now. They send us 11%.

    That means the grand total of imported oil from unfriendly, unstable or Middle eastern nations is approximately: 48%

    We also import oil from friendly nations such as Canada (16%), the U.K. and Norway (each about 2%).

    That ups the total US imports to about 68%.

    This is NOT a good scenario.

    You may argue that 17% from Middle East sources alone is not “dependence” since it doesn’t represent more than half our imports.

    I will argue that if you break your ankle, you need a crutch to walk. That may not represent literally half of your mobility, but you would still need the crutch.

    Middle East oil is a crutch, and as someone who lived through both the 1973 and 1979 Arab oil embargoes and saw the economic havoc each created in this nation, I can tell you that the economic consequences of our country using so much Middle East and other foreign oil sources are potentially catastrophic.

    To suggest that we merely sit on domestic sources of oil, coal, natural gas, etc. and hope that other nations will be willing to sell us commodities is unwise, to say the least.

    So, you see, my argument is not ad hominen. I just assumed it was blindingly obvious to anyone who read a little bit.

    My bad.

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