Arizona Proposition 13 Falls Short

Prop 13 Arizona:  Short on signatures but campaign will continue

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Wednesday, July 2, 2008
CONTACT: Lynne Weaver, Chairman
Phone:  (602) 765-1344
Email:  Chairman@Prop13Arizona.com
Website:  www.Prop13Arizona.com

Phoenix, AZ   2 July 2008 – Despite strong voter support for Prop 13 Arizona, the citizen’s initiative came up short on signatures required to qualify for the November ballot.

The Prop 13 Arizona committee plans to re-file the initiative for the subsequent general election.

“An outstanding group of volunteers came together and worked to bring property tax reform to Arizona.  We’ll continue the Prop 13 Arizona campaign this summer as we update our business plan, start new fundraising, and reorganize our effort so we’re ready to start collecting signatures again in November.  Most of our dedicated volunteers are staying with us for the campaign.” stated Chairman Lynne Weaver.

It took Howard Jarvis four attempts before he finally succeeded in passing California’s Prop 13 in 1978.  The initiative capped property taxes and stopped people from being taxed out of their homes.  It kicked off a solid 10 year period of government fiscal responsibility and 12 years of unprecedented economic growth.

Arizona’s softening economy and decreased tax revenue make Prop 13 Arizona’s passage even more important.  An income tax increase requires a 2/3 vote in the Legislature and sales taxes have become prohibitive, leaving property taxes as the easiest way to accommodate runaway government spending.


Comments

  1. Just Win Baby says

    Looks like Goldwater’s immigration bills both missed as well. Why do these groups think they can be the first to make it without paid signatures? The number of required signatures is simply too high to do it yourself.

  2. JWB,

    I think you’re right. In this day and age, it is just too difficult to go it alone. Thus, the rise of a cottage industry of paid petitioners. Unless a committee can tap into the pockets of some rich donors, it is a long uphill battle to make the cut.

  3. Bobby Hyams says

    This Prop 13 is ill-advised. That’s why it didn’t qualify. The ignorance of single-issue people never ceases to amaze me. They destroy good things to eliminate one bad thing. They would be better off putting their energies into running for office and fixing the bad items one by one rather than creating multiple problems with bad ideas.

    The Goldwater measures were popular and sure to qualify except for one thing: there were too many starts and stops to the effort. The group was too tied to the plans being worked in the Legislature and trying not to interfere with those. Had Don kept his eye on his measures and ignored the ideas being discussed by lawmakers, he would have made it. People are sick of illegal immigration.

  4. Bobby Hyams, about 80% of voters disagree with you and your statement. Few people declined to sign the Prop 13 Arizona petitions. Calling us ignorant speaks volumes about your character, or lack thereof.

    We are modifying our business plan and will re-file in November after the election. The highest property tax bills ever will arrive in October and we will be prepared to capitalize on the backlash.

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