Arizona Education Network anything but non-partisan

Recently, several new outlets were tricked into running stories about the slanted ratings of the front-group Arizona Education Network (AEN.)

ane_ann-eve-pedersen

The spokes person for the group, Ann Eve Pedersen, is a former reporter with the Arizona Daily Star and now defunct Tucson Citizen. She has donated to Democratic candidates, $825 to Grijalva in 2009, $500 to President Obama in ’08, plus donations to Reps. Giffords and Pastor. She is so involved with the Democratic Party, the Tucson Weekly statedshe is inextricably linked with Tucson’s Democratic politics.” She is married to Peter Eckerstrom, brother of Paul Eckerstrom (former chair of the Pima County Democratic Party, a position once help by Ann’s own father.) This is not your average PTO mom concerned about education funding. Ann Eve Pedersen is a highly connected Democrat activist who is the spokesperson for a group set up for the sole purpose of slamming Republican candidates right as election season gets under way. It is disappointing that more media outlets did not investigate the people behind AEN before publishing their obviously biased report.


Comments

  1. kralmajales says

    The point Todd is making Stephen is that GI is well known for slight of hand in its data. If most people knew how you counted they would find your data to be quite seriously flawed at best…and not trustworthy at worst.

    1:1 is total fiction. You use the numbers to make it sound like all administrative salaries are the big Presidential, principal, vice and superintendents…when it just plain isn’t. Yes if you lump in everyone that schools hire that are not teacher…physical plant workers…and the like…well you might…might…get toward 1:1…totally nuts.

  2. kralmajales says

    Wanumba,

    on counselors…sorry you had a bad experience…and how many did you have for the entire school? I had two…two…for a school of near a 1000. Why did we not have more…because there was no money. And…because people like you call the work that people do in schools a waste of money.

  3. kralmajales says

    Im sick of letting conservatives spout off this stuff without having to account for it. Stephen got it handed to him today. He keeps asking for Todd to post the data…well Todd took most of his data apart…and by winging it. And if Todd posted any data, I am sure Stephen will just call it “liberal” and walk away. That is how the conservative “cook the numbers” tank at Goldwater works.

  4. This entire thread is illustrative of why we cannot accomplish productive educational reform in Arizona.

    The burn it all down theory is not only destructive but offers no real, attainable alternative.

    The NEA led “leave us alone we are doing the best we can” option is accepting mediocrity as the best we can do.

    When the impetus is on outcomes and not model we will have put children first, our futures over our positions, and can then say…we did it right.

  5. Stephen Kohut,
    I have already outlined many of the problems with relying on the Goldwater Report, the first being we have no access to review the actual data from the schools themselves and any verification that what was provided was even accurate.

  6. “SO, Todd,
    what do you do for a living? You are always disparaging posters about experience, but never offer any credentials in anything of your own.”

    Wanumba – I have never, ever disparaged posters about experience. My point was with Very_disappointed_educator, it is easy to come here and post some claim about seeing something but there is no way to verify the accuracy of the information. I also believe that if someone is in fact witnessing illegal activity, they can easily report it to the proper agencies.

  7. Ann,
    I think you are correct that this thread is illustrative of the problem. I had a statement in which I said I felt we need to focus on outcome and stop either proposing that all that is needed is more money or that all good be better with the same or less. Instead, you have people like Stephen Kohut and wanumba who start blasting away with questionable statistics, evidence based on wildly unprovable perceptions, and nostalgic solutions which don’t take into account today’s realities. When faced with such, is it really surprising to see the educational establishment retrench to its own inflexible position? It is a shame that they do, but it is hardly surprising since it is quite clear the ‘other side’ has no interest in developing a high quality education system but instead have, as you put it, a ‘burn it all down theory.’

  8. Stephen Kohut says

    Todd and lefties,

    So, you have no data to take on GI. As usual for the left. Hot air without substance. So, let’s look at substance just off the presses.

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress, the Nation’s Report Card, has released the latest 2009 reading test scores. Florida hit another home run. Arizona is still waiting in the dugout. Arizona’s fourth grade scores remained unchanged at a low level; Florida’s scores surged ahead.

    Florida’s Hispanics scored 13 points higher than the statewide average for all students in Arizona in 2009. That represents more than a grade level’s worth of learning. Florida’s African American students also essentially tied the statewide average for all students in Arizona. In 1998, the average Arizona student scored two grade levels higher than Florida’s average African American.

    4th Grade reading

    1998 – AZ 206 FL 206 FL Hisp. 198 FL Af.Am. 186

    2009 – AZ 210 FL 226 FL Hisp. 223 FL Af.Am. 211

    Arizona lawmakers are considering several bills based on Florida reforms, including alternative teacher certification, grading of public schools, expansion of parental choice programs and the curtailment of social promotion by retaining third-grade students who can’t read. The unions and associations that got Arizona education into this mess (AEA, School Boards Association, etc.) oppose each of these reforms; but they are standing on morally untenable ground. With the right mix of policy and courage, Arizona could achieve the same sort of academic gains. I have said it before and I will say it again: when it comes to education reform, I’ll have what Florida is having!

  9. Stephen Kohut,
    Why don’t you come back when you can do more than copy talking points from the Goldwater Institute.

  10. Stephen Kohut says

    todd,

    Now you don’t like the NAEP report card and the conclusions from it. Why don’t you come back with data to back your point of view. Trouble is, there isn’t any or you would have supplied it. I have no difficult backing my point of view.

  11. Florida is doing great things. Denver is doing great things. Arizona has schools that are doing great things…of all models; district public, public charter and private. We also have down right crappy schools of all models.

    Stop the positioning on models and delivery system. No one model is always good or bad. Stop demanding money is the answer. It isn’t, but it is also necessary.

    The support of positive progress does not, and should not be, based on the destruction of other models. Competition will take care of that.

    Any entity that takes public funds should be obligated to the same standards of delivery and services as it pertains to student achievement. Any entity that accepts public funds should have the same reporting and regulations. If, based on parental choice, the school of a parents choosing offers religious education…so what. It isn’t an imposed state requirement but a choice.

    As a strong public school advocate…if all things are made equal and left to competition I believe the best public school models will thrive and be replicated. They will be the choice of parents…and those that have failed will be shut down. Basically, if you can’t compete you have no reason to exist.

  12. Motivated Voter says

    Not that this is even part of the conversation at this point, but I just saw this come up over Twitter:

    Extra! Extra! Arizona Education Network – Covert Front Operation? Enquiring minds want to know (?): http://tiny.cc/gdk8

    I’ll say it again: launching a spin attack on a parent volunteer to try and draw attention away from a miserable record on education isn’t a great idea. Rants like Stephen’s keep me from even reading this site much anymore. I wish the GOP legislators in my district would get a clue how much they are disenfranchising my family. It has become almost impossible for me to vote for them this year.

  13. Stephen Kohut says

    Motivated Voter,

    If having hard data on what works and what fails, what is succeeding and what does not is a “rant” than please go back into your MSNBC liberal spin zone and turn up the volume on Rachel Maddow. You are not ready for the real world of a meritocracy.

    I have a sign on my desk given to me by an R&D group years ago. It reads “The Data Shall Set You Free”. When I got handed the job to turn around that failing group I saw that their biggest problem was they were trying to get their results to fit their preconceived model of how things should work. You develop the model from the data and not try to cram the data into a model. They learned and eventually succeeded. Liberals have the same failing as that R&D group did. There is a preconceived notion that things just have to work a certain way. More money means better educated children. A lower student/teacher ratio means better educated children. And on, and on. When the models that are developed from the data say otherwise liberals rant “it can’t be that way”, “there is something wrong with the data”. Sorry folks. After 30 years in multiple industries working in almost every area except accounting, 13 patents and design/build of first of a kind plants, you follow that data and let it lead you.

  14. Stephen Kohut says

    One last data tidbit.

    Based on terranova reading and math scores for public and charter schools in the Phoenix Metro area:

    6 of the top 10 elementary schools are charters
    7 of the top 10 middle schools are charters
    8 of the top 10 high schools are charters

    See a pattern folks?

    If you want to check things out for yourself wander off to http://www.greatschools.net.

  15. …………………..
    todd Says:
    March 30th, 2010 at 8:25 am
    Wanumba – I have never, ever disparaged posters about experience
    ………………….

    Of course not. Never, ever.

  16. Ann Says:
    March 30th, 2010 at 8:20 am
    This entire thread is illustrative of why we cannot accomplish productive educational reform in Arizona.

    The burn it all down theory is not only destructive but offers no real, attainable alternative.
    ……..

    I listed very plainly the easiest three corrections that need to be made:
    1) teaching, not “facilitating”
    2) teacher competencies in subjects
    3) return to established successful curriculum, no experimental, political junk

    How are these not attainable?

    Well, they are not if the unionized teachers refuse to improve themselves, figuring the union will provide cover.

    Frankly, cannot understand how a “teacher” can be responsible for the same subject for ten years and not know it, just a classroom monitor who passes out papers, tells kids to read the instructions and then sits at the computer sipping a super-size Diet Pepsi for the rest of the class.

    We especially were charmed by the teacher who microwaved snacks and ate them for herself in front of the students as they tried to focus on their papers, the aroma of pocket pizzas and so forth filling the room, an hour before the hungry kids could go for lunch themselves.

    The American education system is so messed in so many ways it isn’t funny. The teachers of my generation would have slit their wrists before even dreaming of eating or drinking ANYTHING, even water in front of a class. They were PROFESSIONALS. Arizona is at the bottom of this collective mess, and frankly, it’s a total waste to aspire for Florida standards when real reform would send Arizona to the TOP of the states. WHy all the hand-wringing to make it to mediocre?

    The good curriculum is out there – no reinventing the wheel, just buy it and it’s no more expensive and usually cheaper than the ten-ton crap in student backbacks right now.

    The problem then is the teaching and incompetent teachers. Require the teaching colleges to add subject competency for the degree, require current teachers to get up to speed. They spend plenty of time in “in-service workshops” that could be shifted to subjects instead of “process” and “techniques.”

    A lot of teachers would actually step up and improve themselves, so fire the ones who won’t and hire live bodies with go-go.

    It’s a disaster, wimpy and passive and half-hearted solutions are NOT the answer.

  17. wanumba,
    please point to where I have disparaged someone’s experience or retract your claim.

  18. Stephen Kohut says

    wanumba,

    I agree with your points on a dummied down curriculum, low quality of the teaching staff and an embedded union that resists all changes.

    When I was in school during the “dark ages” of the 1960’s and 70’s our public schools had it together with top notch classes and staff. Math, science, history, English and physical education were required in all grades 7~12. A foreign language was required for all grades 7~11. Honors or AP classes were offered in every area starting in 5th grade. In 7th grade we were doing matrix algebra of simultaneous linear equations, probability and statistics. I had 3 years of differential and integral calculus when I graduated high school. This was normal for suburban NY schools. The teaching staff was exceptionally professional.

    In additional to all those failing we have system that refuses to be accountable, that does not want to measure itself and reward based on performance. You get what you measure and what you pay for. Teacher and management pay is not tied into student performance. The local measurement system, AIMS, has been fatally dummied down so the results don’t look bad. Where else do you give a 10th grade test to qualify to graduate from 12th grade?

    Is there a lot to fix? Almost beyond measure. Can it be done in one great cataclysmic event? Probably not. It is going to take an ongoing series of changes. It took years to get this bad. It will take years to fix. If there was a magic wand I would be happy to wave it.

    The first step is to change out the failed boards of directors, AKA the school boards, and then move onto the failed management, AKA the superintendents and principals. It will have to be a top down deal as there is no hope of a bottom up fix with union resistance.

    I push the Florida model not because it is ideal but because it is a place to start that can be sold to people with proven results. It’s an end to the beginning not a beginning to the end of a fix.

  19. Here’s a long, but informative read on Baltimore’s schools: It’s comprehensive and the issues and constraints and options are relevent:

    http://www.calvertinstitute.org/main/pub_detail.php?pub_id=135

    Here’s a point to consider: All it takes is for 24 hours for a parent to change his kid’s schooling circumstances. Parents pull their kids out of crappy situations all the time and put them in better schools.

    Schools order textbooks for the coming year. All they have to do is order EXCELLENT ones instead of the poor ones. The teachers open them up and follow the teacher’s guides that go with them.

    Homeschooling parents do this all the time. Our nation is loaded to the gills with great teaching materials and resources. It’s just a matter of CHOOSING them.

    So, we have everything available, nothing needs to be created from scratch, all available immediately. The problem is the WILL and making the EFFORT. The problem is this has become about political power and not education.

    NOW, a slight shift of subject. The ObamaCare HEALTH CARE in an unhealth sector power grab, nationalized all student college loans. The details are emerging, but it seems that as of July 1, student loans are ONLY to be procured thru the government, can’t go elsewhere. Or else.

  20. Very_disappointed_educator says

    wanumba

    A lot of teachers would actually step up and improve themselves, so fire the ones who won’t and hire live bodies with go-go.
    ……

    I agree 100%

    Stephen Kohut

    The first step is to change out the failed boards of directors, AKA the school boards, and then move onto the failed management, AKA the superintendents and principals. It will have to be a top down deal as there is no hope of a bottom up fix with union resistance.
    …..

    I agree 100% here too.

  21. todd Says:
    March 30th, 2010 at 3:50 pm
    wanumba,
    please point to where I have disparaged someone’s experience or retract your claim.
    ………..

    And what did you say your background and experience is in? Sorry, I missed it somewhere, can you repeat it?

  22. todd's bud says

    Dude todd is still in college. No mortgage, no wife or kids and no real job yet, exactly zero experience to draw from

  23. Noo. Say it ain’t so.

    Speaking of zero experience in anything, did ya’ll know that Obama’s mentor, domestic terrorist William “Weatherman Bombs Away” Ayers was one of the brains behind the worst Math curriculum in the USA?
    That would be “Chicago Math.” Not kidding. It’s everywhere in public shcools and in too many naive private schools, designed to bring about a “new way of thinking” in math. Yeah. Like math incompetent.

    Math is one of those disciplines that teaches logical thinking. Radical Ayers and fellow travelers were motivated to disrupt the development of logical problem-solving.

    It is not an accident so many younger people flop all over the place in arguments and reasoning.

  24. wanumba,
    Why are you so concerned about my occupation? Sorry, but regardless whether someone is a bartender, a lawyer, a bank teller, that doesn’t mean their arguments are any more or less valuable than any one else. I will say that ‘todd’s bud’ clearly doesn’t know me.

    Again, point to where I have disparaged someone’s experience? You made they claim, now back it up or retract it.

  25. Stephen Kohut says

    Todd,

    Deficient education book smart. World dumb.

    wanumba,

    Does that about sum up wet behind the ears todd? His posts make sense now in the context of no world experience to draw on and flipping the pages of a lefty textbook to find out what he should be thinking.

  26. You guys are so transparent. You aren’t handling the debate well so you are making stuff up. Pretty pathetic.

  27. Stephen Kohut says

    todd,

    “You aren’t handling the debate well so you are making stuff up.”

    No son, we don’t “have to make things up”. We are speaking from many years of life experience and knowledge you don’t have yet and can’t relate to because you have not been there and done that at this point of your life. Youth today have forgotten that wisdom is learning from the experiences of others rather than having to pay the life consequences for it yourself. My grandparents were some of the wisest people I have every met. They escaped Europe and immigrated to the US a few years before before WW I, raised a family in the midst of the Great Depression, saved for their retirement and lived the American Dream. I learned everything I could from them. The wisdom they imparted serves me well to this very day and I am thankful I did not have to pay some of the prices they did for it.

  28. Stephen Kohut Says:
    March 30th, 2010 at 6:51 pm
    Todd,

    Deficient education book smart. World dumb.

    wanumba,

    Does that about sum up wet behind the ears todd? His posts make sense now in the context of no world experience to draw on and flipping the pages of a lefty textbook to find out what he should be thinking.
    …………

    They make perfect sense in terms of how many minutes one needs to fade out for a bit to google a topic one knows nothing about, then glean what one ASSUMES are germane pithy quotes and stats.

  29. Stephen. you are under the incorrect assumption I am a young person. I just am not going to attempt to claim I am right because of my age or anything else which is irrelevant to the topic. I am done with your ridiculous attempts to divert the discussion from substantive points.

  30. wanumba,
    All you do here is talk about topics you clearly know nothing about. It is quite telling to see you a Stephen ramble on about your age and experience, all the while acting like 15 year old boys.

  31. Stephen Kohut says

    wanumba,

    I think todd is taking poorly to his mentoring. Seems to think life experience and knowledge have nothing to do with wisdom, judgment and the gravitas that should be given to an opinion. How say you?

  32. Stephen – In another thread you said that talking to Klute was like talking to your 35 year old daughter, who you referred to as a ‘dingbat’ because she didn’t value your ‘experience.’ Besides revealing yourself as someone who shouldn’t be giving anyone family advice, it is quite clear you are transferring your family issues to me. I don’t want to be part of your little psychodrama here. Its quite sad really.

  33. You are referring to THIS comment?
    …………………
    The Klute Says:
    March 29th, 2010 at 9:34 pm
    Stephen,

    ““Talking” with you is like talking with my dingbat daughter who, at 35, has squat for life experiences and all the answers for the world at the same time.”
    ………….

    Someone’s “transferring family issues,” but it isn’t Stephen, is it, Todd? And everyone was willing to just let it slide on by for the hapless daughter’s sake, but yYOU dredged it up.

  34. And after all this blah blah, Arizona’s education system STILL sucks but the AEN is pushing the same old “more money” for failure.

    Arizona could rocket to the top of the 50 states in five years flat if it started teaching to provide real academic skills via a solid curriculum and actual informed instruction.

    One failing, poor school in Baltimore did just that, one of the worst in the city. They threw out the crap public curriculum and put in the private traditional Calvert School curriculum. They went from 25th%ile to 85th%ile in five years and families started clambering to move back into the district.

  35. wanumba,
    I am not at fault for what someone else said nor do I see the need to ‘let it slide’ when someone presumes to lecture others based upon their ‘life experience’ or supposed knowledge. If this is going to be the basis of your argument, the quality of one’s experience, judgement and truthfulness become part of the discussion. This is precisely why I don’t see much place for it in these forums since none of these things can be judged outside of the comments made and what people choose to state about themselves. Presenting facts, arguments, data, statistics, etc. are part of debate. Claiming you have some privileged judgement which others can’t question is not, it is a sign of someone who is angered by anyone challenging them.

  36. Very sorry to hear about the passing of outstanding teacher Jaime Escalante: “STAND AND DELIVER”

    http://michellemalkin.com/

    Escalante achieved great things with his students by excellent instruction and the public school dumped him – he inconveniently blew a huge hole in their excuses that the school wasn’t achieving because their students were all “poor” and “disadvantaged.”

    Blame the kids, never the teachers, never the way the school is run.

  37. When I saw this thread had reached in to the 80+ comments I was excited to see if folks were actively engaged in a reform discussion….alas it is 3 voices in a ping pong match. Again, very illustrative of the current condition that plagues education reform.

    However…if the names where removed to protect the innocent…or gulty, depending on what side of the story you are on…and asked what your ideal school system or delivery method was, I’m guessing the three of you would be much more similar than you expect.

    Stephen is right in his post #68. He is right about the charter school successes. But, a number of the worst rated schools are also charter; the lowest performing and the worst run fiscally.

    What this tells us is success is possible and attainable FOR ALL students. It is the adults that prevent it. Not necessarily the model with the administrators or school boards, but they do not get a free pass. Parents, teachers, administrators, school boards, and the state play a very important role. The AIMS test is a joke, the labels are a joke, and the data is all based on different criteria depending on which entity is doing the evaluation.

    Students need rigor. Teachers need expectations and outcomes. Parents need a clear and concise measurement by which to determine if their child is progressing. Administrators need less regulation telling them what they cannot do, cannot impose, and cannot expect. School boards need to be less policy driven and more shareholder (as in tax payer) representative…statute is very limiting and has tied the hands of board members who have tried for reform in their schools.

    The system is broken…their time is not retrievable and these children are not disposable.

    Public education is a Jeffersonian principle that has encouraged and insured the liberty and freedom of our people. That is the loss we face in our failure to correct it and provide to this, and future generations, that opportunity.

  38. Stephen Kohut says

    todd,

    When a business hires a consultant to turn around a bad situation they do not go out and get a business major. They bring in an expert with the knowledge, experience and track record to address their issues. The expert knows how to diagnose the problem and why to or not to take certain approaches. The student may know the method in theory but has no experience in its pratical application and does not understand the possible consequences of their recommendations. They only know “it should would this way becaue the book said so”.

    Your proposition would have it that because a student does well in a debate society they are ready to practice the field they are arguing. I can see where the student might wish it were so. Life says otherwise.

    Businesses, just like people, have free will and will or will not follow the expert’s recomendations with the consequences that follow from their choice. Life is like that. My “dingbat” daughter thinks that just because the last 99 people who put their finger in the light socket got shocked it doesn’t mean the same will happen to her when she insists on doing the same thing. People and businesses both have free will, both can choose to take poorly to their rearing, that they can write their own rules for how things should work.

  39. LD30 Voter says

    C Wren, sorry I just checked back. As an active parent and classroom volunteer, this isn’t really that much of an issue in my district.

    However, I have to say that I was a little repelled by the tone this thread has taken. Is this type of animosity and name calling always present on this blog? I’m not a regular reader, but it seems like people have lost their ever-lovin’ minds. Where’s the constructive dialogue? The personal attacks are unseemly.

    As a fiscal conservative, I don’t want to waste my money (taxes), but I can tell you that in my well-run school district, there’s not enough money and what there is is not being wasted. It’s an extremely well-run district, and it excels.

    However, it’s a real turn-off to come to this forum and see one or two people turn the debate into personal attacks. I want no part in this sort of tit for tat. I came looking for solid opinions and rational debate. This sort of respectability seems to be missing…and not just in the forum.

  40. Annie Hoyle says

    LD30 Voter,
    Keep reading… this blog is awesome. I think the two gentlemen who got into it with todd were just a little tired of him. We all are. I think there are a couple of folks who comment just for sport and, unfortunately, some of us buy into it too often. Most of the time, you will find “solid opinions” and “rational debate” ….especially from wanumba and Stephen Kohut. That’s my opinion.

  41. AZ Ed Watch says

    Ann March 31st, 2010 at 6:25 am,

    Great post. Be sure to pass that on to AEN so they can stop the finger pointing, the mocking, and the complaining and they can start putting their tremendous efforts into working towards solutions.

  42. …………………….
    Ann Says:
    March 31st, 2010 at 6:25 am
    It is the adults that prevent it. Not necessarily the model with the administrators or school boards, but they do not get a free pass. Parents, teachers, administrators, school boards, and the state play a very important role. The AIMS test is a joke, the labels are a joke, and the data is all based on different criteria depending on which entity is doing the evaluation.
    ……………

    Exactly.
    DIdn’t want to get into the parental inputs, because that’s another very big subject, but there are serious failures of parental responsibility that contribute to the overall education debacle.

    But, the ENTIRE education establishment is CORRUPTED and is DISHONEST and does MISLEAD parents. Case in point: What should be an independent check on the system, actually aids and abets covering the decline. The ITBS testing score report sent to parents employs a sly graphing trick to visually display the actual scores.
    Instead of equally spaced percentages, 0%- 10%-20%-30%-40% .. to 90% and 100%, the spacing from 20-40% is greater than 0-20% and 80-100%. This forces the scoring lines for low scores to appear as if they represent closer to average (50%) than they are, while diminishing the high scores.

    They aren’t technically LYING to the parents, the actual scores are there, but if the graph had been marked out equally as people assume it has been, then the low scores would be NOTICEABLY LOW. Alarm bells go off, parents go to the school, “What’s the flip are you all doing here?”
    This way, it implies the scores fall within reasonable parameters, even though they don’t.

    The SAT has caved to pressure several times to simplify the test. Now colleges get numerous applicants with perfect SAT scores, when four decades ago, one perfect scoring student in the nation would have made national news.

    Schools also employ another trick designed to keep parents off their backs. Instead of “math class” where all students take the same instruction, the schools divide the students into “high” “medium” or “low” math levels. SO, the students are not getting the same math, even though they are all in the same grade. The parents get the report card. Their kid has an “A” in math. They are happy. They do not know that their kid is in a measurably lower level of math than the kid in the chair next to him, who also has an “A”, but he’s taking “high” math. The “A”s are NOT equivalent in any way. But the parents do not know their kid is being cheated – he will never advance out of “low” becuase he simply isn’t getting the same curriculum year to year as the “high” or “medium” levels. He is actually being held back. But the “A” keeps the parents at bay. WHen the kid hits the SAT and gets crap scores, they don’t know why. “Maybe he isn’t good in a test situation.”

    Hide the decline.

  43. Stephen Kohut says

    The first step in fixing the education system is cleaning out the “powers that be” that control it. The state boards (education, charter schools, etc.) and local school boards. Many of the state boards have openings. Check them out, find one that suits your passion and apply to be on it.

    http://azgovernor.gov/bc/

    Do not expect rapid action, vacancies or not. This is the government and slow is the word. I applied a month ago for current openings on the state boards for Education & Charter Schools. The “we will be in touch with you shortly” response just means you have to keep calling in and check like I did today. Impassioned knowledgeable involvement is the first action to take toward the fix. Find out when your next school board elections are and consider being a candidate. Put together a pragmatic reform slate for people to consider if you can find good, likeminded people. None of this gets fixed by blogging. While I do enjoy it, I consider blogging more as recreational fun than effective action.

  44. …………………..
    Impassioned knowledgeable involvement is the first action to take toward the fix. Find out when your next school board elections are and consider being a candidate. Put together a pragmatic reform slate for people to consider if you can find good, likeminded people. None of this gets fixed by blogging. While I do enjoy it, I consider blogging more as recreational fun than effective action.
    ……………..

    That’s exactly right.

  45. Stephen Kohut says

    wanumba,

    We have to type softly or todd will figure out the secret and actually get involved and do something real.

  46. Very_disappointed_educator says

    This is a link to an online curriculum used by homeschoolers. Can you imagine using this curriculum in public schools. Our 8th graders would have to start at a 2nd or 3rd grade level.

    http://www.amblesideonline.org/index2.shtml

  47. LD30 Voter… “As an active parent and classroom volunteer, this isn’t really that much of an issue in my district.”

    If it’s not yet… be prepared for it to become one.

    Are you aware that at least one rural area WITHOUT schools has the option to send children to Vail for schooling? Do you know who is moving OUT of that area and who is moving INTO that area??

    Housing prices everywhere have fallen and there are those who will rent to anyone who shows them some cash.

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